The Glanville Visiting Scholar 2017

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Dr Meredith Nash, University of Tasmania, will be visiting Lincoln in Autumn 2017. Meredith's most significant contribution to international scholarship has been in the study of gender and embodiment using pregnancy as a case study. She has published extensively in the field

Photo credit: Dr Meredith Nash

Senior Lecturer

Dr Meredith Nash

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania, Australia

Meredith Nash is an interdisciplinary researcher in the fields of sociology of gender, health sociology, and human geography. Her work focuses mainly on the gendered body as a way of understanding the relationships between people, place, politics, and culture. Her publication track record includes two sole-authored books, one edited book, five book chapters, and numerous articles in field-leading, peer-reviewed journals. Her research has informed Australian government and health practice and has received international recognition through the global media, quotation, and award. She currently serves as the Learning and Teaching Coordinator for the School of Social Sciences.

EXPERTISE

Meredith's most significant contribution to international scholarship has been in the study of gender and embodiment using pregnancy as a case study. She has  published extensively in the field including one monograph, Making 'Postmodern' Mothers: Pregnant Embodiment, Baby Bumps, and Body Image (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), that comprehensively examines how women negotiate social expectations that frame the pregnant body. Her edited book Reframing Reproduction: Conceived Gendered Experiences in Postmodernity, was published in 2014 by Palgrave Macmillan. She has also published research on pregnant brides, pregnancy fitness, the role of self- photography on pregnancy body image, experiences of reproductive technology, and more recently, family photographs of pregnancy and cultural memory. She is  lead CI on a project funded by the Tasmanian Early Years Foundation involving collaboration with two state-wide organisations that explores how Tasmanian men experience the transition to fatherhood and aims to identify men's educational and care needs. She is a CI on a Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Therapeutic Guidelines grant with colleagues at Menzies Institute for Medical Research on a project that aims to develop an evidenced-based approach to the integration of disease-specific guidelines to better manage multimorbidity. Meredith is also lead CI of a new study, The Tasmanian Gym Project, that uses the gym as an institutional site to critically examine the cultural meanings and social consequences of fitness practices in Tasmania (funded by the UTAS Institute for the Study of Social Change).