Social construction

In a society with ingrained institutional sexism, understanding past and present social enforcement of the conceptions of ‘masculinity’ and ‘femininity’ is vital for promoting equality

Professor for the public understanding of research, School of History & Heritage

Professor Carenza Lewis

Professor for the public understanding of research, School of History & Heritage

  01522 837107

My research explores how archaeological finds of items related to children’s play can advance understanding of the extent to which gender impacted on how and where children played and what they played with in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Excavations of more than 2000 1m2 ‘test pits’ in eastern England, primarily intended to reconstruct the long-term development of historic settlements, have produced a large number of finds of recent date mostly from domestic contexts such as gardens, greens, verges and playgrounds.  My research asks whether items which may be female-gendered (such as doll parts and tea sets) and those which may be male-gendered (such as toy soldiers and vehicle parts) are found in similar or different types of places, and what we can infer from this about adult attitudes to children of different genders, and the attitudes of children of different genders to their playthings. Academic profile

Senior Lecturer, School of Health & Social Care

Robert Goemans

Senior Lecturer, School of Health & Social Care

  01522 837423

Rob is a registered social worker with research interests in mental health, gender, adult social care law, values, and history of madness. He is an elected member of The College of Social Work’s mental health faculty, an executive committee member of the Social Perspectives Network, and still practises as an AMHP.  Academic profile

Lecturer, School of History & Heritage

Dr Jade Shepherd

Lecturer, School of History & Heritage

  01522 83 5033

I’m a historian with research interests in Victorian asylums, crime, gender and psychiatry. My Ph.D thesis, ‘Victorian Madmen: Broadmoor, Masculinity and the Experiences of the Criminally Insane 1863-1900’, examined the crimes, trials and asylum experiences of men committed into Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum. I’m currently working on my first monograph, Broadmoor’s Men: Masculinity, Class and the Victorian Criminal Lunatic Asylum. Academic profile

Senior Lecturer, School of Social & Political Sciences

Dr Ana Jordan

Senior Lecturer, School of Social & Political Sciences

  01522 88 6119

Programme Leader: MA Gender Studies

Ana obtained a PhD from the University of Bristol in Politics, entitled “Gender and the Ethics of Care: Theorising care through fathers’ rights discourses”. Ana specialises in political theory, gender and politics and new social movements. Her research interests encompass debates in contemporary political theory around the ethics of care, and issues relating to masculinities  Academic profile

Senior Lecturor, School of History & Heritage

Dr Erin Bell

Senior Lecturor, School of History & Heritage

  01522 886941

My gender-related research initially focussed, during my PhD (2003) at the University of York (supervisor Dr Mark Jenner) on masculinity in the early modern period; specifically, the differences between ideal manly behaviour of members of religious nonconformist minority groups such as Quakers, in contrast to those in the religious mainstream, and focussing on the significance of pacifism to Quaker identity. More recently I have started to explore the representation of such groups by outsiders in the period c.1650-1800, which has enabled me to consider the threat to hegemonic masculinity posed by alternatives such as Quaker pacifism manhood, but also by Quaker women, who played a very active role in the life of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in the period and therefore were at times perceived as an unruly threat to the gender status quo. In addition, when working as part of the AHRC-funded Televising History 1995-2010 research project (2006-10), and in later work considering the representation of the past onscreen, much of my research has considered the different televisual representations of men and women, both as historical actors and as professional historians. Academic profile

Lecturer in Fine Art, School of Fine & Performing Arts

Dr Elena Cologni

Lecturer in Fine Art, School of Fine & Performing Arts

  01522 835368

Elena specialises in Fine Art (site specific, dialogic, performace, sculpture, drawing) as interface in society (psychology and sociology, gendered cognition), memory studies (cultural and communicative memory,  memory and presentness), interdisciplinary approaches to research, research methodologies. Her current artistic research approach is build on an ongoing interdisciplinary methodology, on the nature of the relationship artwork/artist interchange based on perceptual dynamics, including the surfacing of memory in the present through dialogic encounters. Her work "aims at enhancing an awareness of the unstable nature of perception in relation to live processes of memorisation (and recollection). She has ‘played’ with notions of memory as archival and removable, trying to enhance the audience’s and her own experience of who they are in any given moment by dealing with (and processing) representations of the immediate or the remote past in order to make sense of the present.  Cologni initiated the collaborative project ‘ROCK FLUID (Shaping memory in transit)’ with the Department of Experimental Psychology at Cambridge University, to frame a series of site responsive projects revolving around how memory, perception and place impact on the construction of our identity. Academic profile

Lecturer, Lincoln Business School

Hanya Pielichaty

Lecturer, Lincoln Business School

  01522 83 5695

Hanya joined the University in 2011 as a lecturer in the Tourism and Events team. Her research interests are focused on gender identity development, particularly in adolescent girls, in the context of football participation and events management. Aademic profile

Lecturer, School of Psychology

Dr Julie Van de vyver

Lecturer, School of Psychology

Julie is a Social and Developmental Psychologist specialising in prosocial behaviour, prejudice and discrimination, moral emotions, equality and human rights, intergroup and intragroup dynamics, social cohesion, and gender equality. She is particularly interested in uncovering and testing effective strategies for promoting prosocial behaviours and reducing prejudice and discrimination. Her research employs both experimental and correlational methods and lab-based and field-based studies to further develop our understanding of prosociality and prejudice. Julie's approach is to understand not just the processes at work but also the practical steps for intervention. In particular she is interested in employing research to help advance the effectiveness of public and civil sector endeavours. Academic profile