Inclusive research environments

  • girl using computer

Interdisciplinary research that seeks to develop new strategies for changing system-wide attitudes, culture and practices within HEI communities, and building inclusive research environments across the sector

The academic research landscape has changed enormously since the inception of pre-Athena SWAN strategies some 30 years ago. No significant change, however, has been observed in the diversity of our research communities during that period. Indeed, in some STEMM disciplines diversity has declined (e.g. female representation on computer science programmes has dropped from 37% in 1983 to 17% in 2016). Although Athena SWAN (AS) is now commonplace across HEIs, structural issues of the gendered gap in pay and working conditions, disproportionate barriers to career progression, and a limited number of women in senior academic and management roles, remain prevalent across the sector. This is not, however, a gender-only concern. Barriers to recruitment, retention and promotion also intersect with questions of race, sexuality, ability and class, and have led to the under-representation of other groups (i.e. BAME, LGBTQ and people with disabilities). With the substantial investment over the last 30 years failing to create a fully diverse workforce, it is now time for a paradigm shift in strategy, and an overhaul of our approaches to inclusion and diversity.

Professor of Analytical Chemistry & Cultural Heritage

Professor Belinda Colston

Professor of Analytical Chemistry & Cultural Heritage

  01522 837448

Belinda has been leading the University’s gender equality initiatives in STEM since 2012. A nuclear chemist by training, she is particularly interested in the progression of female academics in STEM subject areas and has developed a number of supportive initiatives at Lincoln. Academic profile

Director of Research Impact Development

Dr Julie Bayley

Director of Research Impact Development

  01522 835437

Dr Julie Bayley is an  impact specialist and Chartered Health Psychologist. Julie has been an applied researcher in behaviour change interventions since 2003 and now combines academic research, impact management and training to develop impact literacy across research environment. Julie is champion of the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA) Impact Special Interest Group, leads ARMA impact training and sits on the ARMA Professional Development Committee. In 2015 she won the inaugural ARMA Impact award in recognition of her national reputation for building impact capacity. Julie is currently commissioned as Emerald Publishing Impact Literacy Advisor to support their ‘Real World Impact’ programme and works particularly with National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to strengthen impact governance and impact of public and patient involvement. Academic profile

Distinguished Profesor in Social Research

Professor Steve McKay

Distinguished Profesor in Social Research

  01522 886629

Steve McKay is a Distinguished Professor in Social Research in the School of Social & Political Sciencesl, and joined the University in April 2013. Between 2007 and 2013 he was professor in social research at the University of Birmingham, where he was also Director of the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre from 2010. He specialises in social research; inequality; family policy; quantitative methods; social security and pensions.

Professor of Human Computer Interaction

Professor Antonella De Angeli

Professor of Human Computer Interaction

Antonella De Angeli is Professor in the School of Computer Science and Associate Professor of Human-Computer Interaction at the University of Trento (Italy). Antonella's research investigates cultural, social and cognitive implications of computing technology with an emphasis on transforming this knowledge into principles and practices of socially-responsible design. Within this frame, she has investigated the individual and societal determinants of the gender gap in ICT research and development (where women are substantially underrepresented), and the effect of this gap in the inclusivity of current ICT artefacts. Her research on the effect of (gendered) embodiments on the way people interact with, make sense of, and build relationships in virtual worlds gave rise to several international workshops, two journal special issues and attracted considerable press attention including the New Scientist and the Times Higher Education. She participated in GARCIA a H2020 project concerned with the implementation of actions to promote a gender culture and combat gender stereotypes and discriminations in European Universities and research centres. Academic profile