Embodiment

  • Female model being photographed in a studio

Embodiment research, within and across disciplines, relates to the mind-body-world linkage and our ways of being and having a body within a socio-cultural framework, including conceptualisations of gender, age, class, ethnicity, degrees of dis/ability, and sexuality

Professor in Sociology & Physical Culture, School of Sport & Exercise Science

Professor Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson

Professor in Sociology & Physical Culture, School of Sport & Exercise Science

  01522 837728

Director, Health Advancement Research Team (HART)

Principal research interests cohere around the sociology of the body; embodiment and the senses; health and wellbeing; identity and identity work; sociological & feminist phenomenology; autoethnographic & autophenomenographic approaches.  I enjoy (mostly!) grappling with the sometimes uneasy nexus of sociology and phenomenology.

My gender-related research areas span a range of projects on embodiment, identity and identity work, and physical cultures, in some of which I have adopted a feminist phenomenological perspective.  Recent work includes qualitative research on gender and dance teaching, feminist phenomenology and the distance running woman, and ongoing research on the sensory dimensions of sporting and physical-cultural embodiment, including women’s boxing and mixed martial arts. I have also undertaken research on gender and intimate partner abuse and violence. Academic profile

Professor of Human Computer Interaction

Professor Antonella De Angeli

Professor of Human Computer Interaction

Antonella De Angeli is Professor in the School of Computer Science and Associate Professor of Human-Computer Interaction at the University of Trento (Italy). Antonella's research investigates cultural, social and cognitive implications of computing technology with an emphasis on transforming this knowledge into principles and practices of socially-responsible design. Within this frame, she has investigated the individual and societal determinants of the gender gap in ICT research and development (where women are substantially underrepresented), and the effect of this gap in the inclusivity of current ICT artefacts. Her research on the effect of (gendered) embodiments on the way people interact with, make sense of, and build relationships in virtual worlds gave rise to several international workshops, two journal special issues and attracted considerable press attention including the New Scientist and the Times Higher Education. She participated in GARCIA a H2020 project concerned with the implementation of actions to promote a gender culture and combat gender stereotypes and discriminations in European Universities and research centres. Academic profile

Senior Lecturer, School of Social & Political Sciences

Dr Simon Obendorf

Senior Lecturer, School of Social & Political Sciences

  01522 88 6268

Simon's research explores the ways in which processes of global change and exchange impact upon experiences of sex, gender, sexuality and the body. His work in critical international relations traces how the politics of embodiment and everyday life serve as windows to a broader understanding of international politics and contemporary flows of globalization.

Much of Simon’s research draws upon materials from East and Southeast Asia. His recent work has explored how the bodies of female flight attendants on a major Asian airline become inscribed with state and transnational understandings of gender, femininity and both national and regional identity. Elsewhere his work has explored the quest for lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual and transgender rights in East and Southeast Asia and the ways in which queer bodies have become enmeshed in, and subject to, broader discourses of security, nationalism, citizenship and postcolonial development. Simon’s expertise has been sought by NGO and activist groups in East and Southeast Asia and informed submissions to major international human rights bodies. Academic profile

Lecturer, School of Computer Science

Dr Chris Headleand

Lecturer, School of Computer Science

Chris graduated from Bangor University in 2009 with a degree in Design Technology and Education. Following his studies he formed his first software company, which produced web solutions for a range of clients including international PLCs and departments of the European Government. In parallel he worked as a lecture in creative technologies at Coleg Harlech, working with students from a largely disadvantaged background.

In 2012 Chris returned to university to undertake a Master Degree in Computer Systems. Following his master degree Chris was awarded a prestigious Fujitsu High Performance Computing scholarship to undertake a PhD specialising in ethics, philosophy and artificial intelligence. During his PhD Chris also sat on the advisory board for the national supercomputing service, and chaired the user group. Chris joined the University of Lincoln as a lecturer and a member of the IntLab research group. His research interests include Virtual Worlds, Human Computer Interactions, Sexuality and Gender.  Academic profile

PhD Researcher, School of Sport & Exercise Science

Rachel Williams

PhD Researcher, School of Sport & Exercise Science

My doctoral research, entitled ‘Physical activity, ageing and embodiment: The examination of a figuration of retired older men who previously served in the British Armed Forces’ makes an original contribution to the figurational literature on men’s health, ageing and experiences of physical activity. Further, the study takes forward the application of figurational and symbolic interactionist theoretical perspectives by combining these theoretical approaches in order to examine in-depth retired servicemen’s embodied life experiences in relation to health, ageing and physical activity, with an emphasis on embodiment and corporeality. Academic profile